Thankful Days at the Farm

 

Where did this season go? Am I the only one feeling like summer was a blink and then gone? The growing season can be like that, between the sowing, transplanting, fertilizing and harvesting mixed in among all life’s other trappings. And now we’re plowing through fall right on through to the holidays…I wish I could wind back the clock. But even if I could, I doubt anyone would recognize me. 

My husband has the patience of a saint. It was a crazy several months. Last fall I was contacted by a publisher and asked to write a garden book (which was beyond exciting!), so as time trotted out into spring, I thought I had this. I could write 50-60,000 words. I could supply a couple hundred photos. Appendices? Sure, no problem! Oh, and let’s not forget the most important thing, I had to actually garden! A new greenhouse was going up. And not one to turn away work, my wholesale client list for fresh cut herbs grew, I added mail-order scented geraniums and I was booked throughout the end of 2016 for speaking gigs. So let’s just agree that I may not have been at my most sane, but that could also just be from the lack of sleep. 

So this is my long, drawn-out apology to my fellow gardeners out there as to why my blog sat quiet and lonely and your mailboxes might have been missing a BBF summer newsletter. I’m sure we’ve all had a year like that. Yours might have been filled with many good things or some not-so-good moments too, but eventually we all catch a breather. 

Now as I take stock, I can see how some things might have been missed: the temporary hoop house never made it up this year; I was late on getting succession crops in the ground; and on more than one occasion, I was behind on my kitchen garden harvest.  Aside from the dahlias and flowers that went to local brides or florists, almost none made it into the house…I just didn’t get around to it. Oh, the plans I had for landscaping? Never made it off the page. And how can I discuss the growing season and not comment on the water situation? Nine days of rain. All season. A single digit, and those nine days weren’t even dousing rain, they were more like a trickle. All my farmer friends  felt it. Needless to say, I did not have warm fuzzies for the weather gods. But hey, this is the life of a grower, and at the end of the day I am so incredibly lucky to make a living doing something  I love. It is hard work but I am so happy and thankful for this life.

So as we head into the holiday season, all I can think about is all that I’m thankful for (of which CJ, my hubby, is still at the top of my list!). Whether you are a farmer, florist, marketer or home gardener, we are all so lucky to find the joy in growing and sharing it with others who love it as much as we do.

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With Thanksgiving literally around the corner, it’s time to talk turkey. And by that, I mean what you use to roast your turkey. I’ve been cooking Thanksgiving dinner for the past several years and I usually get a Butterball, but this year I’m stepping outside my comfort zone and ordered a locally raised Maine turkey from a neighboring farm. I love supporting local agriculture, but if I’m honest, I’m a bit concerned about how this will all turn out.

The only think I do know is how I will season (and stuff) it! Whether Butterball, local or some other brand, it’s how you cook and season the turkey that matters. So here are some things that I’ll be harvesting fresh from the field to use in our Thanksgiving dinner. 

  • 1 Tbsp. fresh rosemary leaves
  • 1 Tbsp. fresh French thyme
  • 1-2 Tbsp. fresh flat-leaf Italian parsley
  • 1 Tbsp. fresh sage (*I use sage in my stuffing instead of on the turkey, and I prefer to dry it in my food dehydrator a few days ahead so I can crush and grind it. Dried sage is more potent, so I use 1 Tsp. rather than a Tbsp. But, as my mother always reminds me, it’s important to taste as you mix!)

The above herbs can be chopped or minced and either rubbed on the turkey or mixed with butter and basted on the turkey.

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Happy Thanksgiving and holidays to everyone!  

 

By |November 18th, 2016|Growing & Gardening|

I’m Going to Sleep Here!

I cannot believe it’s here and I love it so much! I think I may actually sleep in our new greenhouse–it’s that gorgeous!

NewGreenhouse.KellyOrzelPhotography

 

Last year I was seriously outgrowing the current greenhouse space, and as I would jenga my way in amongst flats of basil, thyme and scented geraniums the little greenhouse troll would whisper …. “You need a larger greenhouse space!”

 

At first I ignored this. There was already so much on our plates with the work we already had. And how would I explain to my husband that I needed even MORE space? I could already imagine his face and the silly questions …

 

1. “You are only one person, how are you going to grow even more plants and have time to take care of them and the rest of the farm?”

2. “How is this greenhouse going to be different from the one you already have?”

3. “Where are you going to put it? I don’t think we can fit another building on the property and what about zoning? How are you going to pay for it?”

 

So many boring, ludicrous and nonsensical questions, but that is how his mind works. And I had answers for all of them.

 

1. “I’ll get up earlier (I may have been crossing my fingers behind my back) to take care off the extra plants.”

2. “This one is going to be bigger. Made of wood and polycarbonate to keep the plants warmer. And I can heat it (that last one may not have made it into the explanation. I can only tell CJ so much of my grand master plans, otherwise he thinks I’m “complicating” things).”

3. “And I’ve already decided where I can put it, contacted and spoke with a supplier and spent time over at the assessment office and got the green light. All I need to do it formally fill out the permit application! Oh, and since I am growing every year, recently received my mail-order certification and orders are rolling in, I’ll just reinvest some of what we made this year into the new greenhouse.”

 

I’ve obviously thought this all through.

And in time he realized it too.

By mid-winter I placed my order, and a few weeks ago it arrived and up like a carni-ride it went!

 

Building3.NewGreenhouse.KellyOrzelPhotography

 

The only concession I made to the hubs was that he wouldn’t have to install it. That made him a lot happier … particularly since I may have mentioned I wanted him to build me some more garden beds and a new compost bin system.  

He really is such a good guy to put up with me and my ever-expanding plans.

 

Building4.NewGreenhouse.KellyOrzelPhotography

 

So up it went in a matter of hours!

 

Building.NewGreenhouse.KellyOrzelPhotography

 

I am loving the powered roof and side vents. All I have to do it set the temperature and it takes care of itself!

I really, really, really could sleep here!

 

Interior.NewGreenhouse.KellyOrzelPhotography

 

Oh, and did I forget to mention benching …

 

Tables.NewGreenhouse.KellyOrzelPhotography

 

Oh yes, all new ebb-and-flow benches! When I was in college and working at a farm in New Jersey they got these and I was in love! I thought all they would ever be is a fantasy. 

 

EbbAndFlowTables.NewGreenhouse.KellyOrzelPhotography

 

Now in case you have not fully grasped my excitement, here is a taste …

 

Kelly2.NewGreenhouse.KellyOrzelPhotography

 

I may have run and jumped around a bit too.

 

Kelly.NewGreenhouse.KellyOrzelPhotography

 

But how could I not? All my garden dreams are coming true! It’s just like Cinderella, just without the pumpkin and glass slipper!

Now I just have to transfer all my plants from the potting shed into my new fancy-shmancy greenhouse!

By |May 4th, 2016|Bowery Beach Farm, Growing & Gardening|

My Favorite Top 10 Seed Sowing Tips

I never mind propagating – whether sowing seed or taking cuttings. And there are a number of things you can do to get your seedlings off to a great start … these are my absolutely favorite tips:

Seeds.KellyOrzelPhotography

1. Use great soil! Happy, healthy, lush plants start with a good base. My favorite all-purpose potting mix is Pro-Mix BX with Mycorrhizae.

2. Moisten your potting mix before you sow your seeds. Watering afterwards often results in seeds sliding around the container. Also, it is hard to ensure the entire potting medium is moist if it’s watered from the top.

3. Label. This step seems obvious but it’s easy to forget every once in awhile (even for me)! For entire or half flats, I use painter’s tape along the side, and for individual pots/plants I use old mini-blinds cut into 4-6-inch lengths. These labels are waterproof and you’ve done your part for the environment by recycling!

4. Keep your seeds and seedlings well lit. I use shop lights over my flats and pots. Yup, the same one from the hardware store. I suspend them 2 inches above the soil and raise them up as the plants grow.

5. If possible, water the trays from the bottom. Place your seeding tray into a standard 1020 tray without holes and let the plants soak up water from the bottom.

 

StrawberryScentedGeranium.KellyOrzelPhotography

 

6. Use bottom heat to speed up the germination process. You can pick up heat mats at your local hardware or garden center. A great garden hack is to use incandescent (not LED) Christmas rope lights under your flats! They will warm, but won’t burn. Then, remove the plants from the heat source once they’ve germinated. (Note: seedlings don’t require as much warmth as seeds.)

7. Get a basic fan. You can find these for a few bucks at Walmart. A little air movement goes a long way to building strong root systems and healthier seedlings. Additionally, air circulation is a good defense against disease and infection.

8.Feed your seedlings once they have 2-4 true leaves with a gentle fertilizer. I prefer a fish emulsion and kelp mixture at half strength. It gives your plants a little boost.

9. Harden them off! Gradually expose your seedlings to cooler temperatures over a week before planting them outside. This avoids shock and transplanting stress.

10. Milk jugs and 1 to 2 liter soda bottles make great DIY cloches! Cut the bottom off and place them over the transplants, sinking the bottom about 1 inch into the soil to anchor it against the wind. On warm days, take the tops off to vent and replace them in the early evening!

11. BONUS: Give your seeds and seedlings a light dusting of cinnamon when sowing. It’s a natural fungicide!

 

By |April 18th, 2016|Growing & Gardening, Propagating|

Compost, the Black Gold

Every gardener’s compost pile aspires to the almighty ‘black gold’. Full or nutrients and beneficial microorganisms, it feeds your vegetables, herbs and flowers so much better than any fertilizer can and the best part of it is, it’s FREE!

The hardest aspect of composting for me is the patience. I have none.

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It takes at least 6 months to turn your garden’s leavings from garbage into gourmet food.

You can make compost in a pile in the corner of your yard or homemade bin. If you are using wood, just be sure that is it not pressure-treated. You don’t want those nasty chemicals leaching out into your compost and then into your food. There are a number of materials that can be used to make great compost, including: plastic, wire, wood, pallets or fencing.

The key to happy, healthy compost is heat and the right amount of brown and green material. 100908_4354

Heat is generated by keeping your piles to a manageable size (3’x 3’x 3′) and turning it weekly. The ingredients are the other half.

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Shredded newspaper, pine needles, dried leaves and cardboard are all good sources of carbon (or brown) materials, while vegetable scraps, grass clippings and other green things are good nitrogen sources. The rule of thumb is for every one bucket of nitrogen, use two of carbon.

Since carbon materials can be in short supply in the growing season I’ll bag up a bunch of leaves in the fall and store them in the shed for use in the summer.

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Once your pile smells nice and woodsy, it’s time to spread it out in the garden. And don’t be stingy! Use a good 3-4 inches and your garden with thank you.

For more on composting and the organic kitchen garden, be sure to check out my new book, The Backyard Gardener!

Scented Geraniums

 

Scented Geraniums are one of my favorites to propagate from cuttings and grow. I love the variety of smells, particularly right after a good rain. And while summer is drawing to a close (sniff, sniff) you don’t need to day goodbye to this pelargonium (a.k.a. scented geranium), now is the time to take some cuttings and pot them up!

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You can take cuttings of this woody geranium anytime from spring to late summer, but I have found that cuttings taken in August and September do especially well. And don’t worry if you are a first-timer or experienced grower, scented geraniums are easy to propagate.

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And we all lose a few, so don’t be worried if you see a casualty or two, it’s not you – it is just the nature of the beast. Even the most experienced propagator will lose some cuttings.

Cuttings root best in moist (NOT wet or soggy) soil. I use a mixture of potting compost or soil and perlite. The perlite gives the mix just a bit of extra space so the cutting can spread its roots out.

Take a clean, sharp razer blade, knife or scissors and snip your cutting from the fresh, fleshy green stems. If you keep your scented geraniums around long enough you will notice they can become rather woody at the base of the plant. That is NOT where you want to take a cutting.

I like to take 2-3″ cuttings from a healthy stem. I always include at least one leaf, but if I have a node (branching) available I take it below the node.

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And although it is tempting to take a cutting from a flowering stem, resist! Either find a new stem or cut the flower off first. If you take a cutting that is flowering the plant’s energy is not going into developing the roots (which it needs to), but rather to the flower, which almost always results in a cutting casualty.

Rooting hormone … ehhh.

I don’t find that it helps the rooting, but if it makes you feel better you can give it a light dusting.

Plant your cutting in a moist potting mix. You can use small 3-4″ pots, or trays if you have the zealous propagator disorder (which I have been known to to suffer from). Use your finger to create a hole, insert your cutting, then gently firm the soil around the cutting.

Place your cuttings in a warm, sunny spot. Right now I have mine on tables in my backyard, but a windowsill will do just as nicely. Then water and wait.

When it comes to watering I find it best to water from the bottom of the pot (if it has holes) or at the base of the plant. You can tell it is time to water when the top of the soil is dry. Be wary of overwatering your geraniums. Let them tell you when they need a drink.

On average it takes 3-4 weeks for the roots to develop, but will happen sooner if given the right conditions (sun, moist soil, and time). You can tell that your cutting has taken if you give a gentle tug on your cutting, and you feel it anchored in place.

Once your cutting has taken, pinch back some of the leaves (only if your cutting has enough leaves) and you will be rewarded with a bushy, happy scented geranium.

I keep my scented geranium babies in the greenhouse, but a kitchen windowsill and/or counter that gets bright light throughout the fall and winter will be all you need so they are ready for the garden (or a container planting) come spring.

If you’ve propagated enough, pot-up your extra scented geraniums in a pretty pot, and give them away to friends and family. They make wonderful holiday gifts and housewarming presents.

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With their subtle flowers, lush leaves and their delicious scents, scented geraniums are a sweet garden surprise to many. For me it was love at first sight. And now I’ve been growing and propagating these ethereal little plants for many, many years.

And now you can too!

For more on growing and the organic kitchen garden, check out my new book, The Backyard Gardener!

Warmly,
Kelly
By |March 27th, 2016|Annuals, Growing & Gardening, Propagating|

Hellebores are here!

Hellebores | Bowery Beach Farm

There are not many plants that thrive in the winter, but Hellebores are one of them!

I love these plants so much I cannot get enough of them. In fact, last year I started my very own collection of these pretty girls in one of my garden. And I just bought two new additions this winter that I plan to plant out in the spring. First is the traditional white Helleborus niger that currently is residing in our guest bathroom.

Hellebores | Bowery Beach Farm

Then there is this green-flowered hellebore, Helleborus argutifolius, that I’m crushing on. Can’t wait to see how it stacks up against the Stinking Hellebore (Helleborus foetidus) – which by the way does NOT stink – and the purple flowered hellebore from Slovenia, Helleborus atrorubens.

By |February 10th, 2016|Cut Flowers, Growing & Gardening, My Life as a Gardener, My Life As A Gardener|

Planning the Garden

Ordering Seed  | Bowery Beach Farm

While it’s still chilly and cold outside here in my office I’m nice and cosy. I love this time of year. There’s nothing to do in the garden but imagine what can be …

Time spent pouring over seed and bulb catalogs. Mostly likely with a glass of wine. 

Making meticulous layouts of this year’s garden that will be modified many times over before the season is over.

And catching up on some of my favorite movies like Anne of Green Gables.

Seed Sorting | Bowery Beach Farm

Just the way I like to spend a wintery day.

By |February 1st, 2016|Bowery Beach Farm, Growing & Gardening, My Life As A Gardener|

12 Christmas Tree Tips

Christmas Tree Tips | Bowery Beach Farm

Your Christmas tree only has two essential needs, cool temperatures and plenty of water! So as long as you make sure your tree has water and isn’t drying out, the only problem you are facing are needles. Follow this guide for a longer-lasting Christmas tree, and stop the drop

Tip 1: Choose and cut your own tree. The longer your tree sits cut on the lot, the more moisture it loses. By cutting your tree down, you know it is as fresh as it’s going to get!

Tip 2: Inspect tree before purchase. Choose a healthy tree. It should have a good scent, and it’s needles flexible at the tips, not brittle to the touch. If the needles fall when gently brushed, then the tree has been sitting too long.

Tip 3: Make fresh cut. When a tree sits, the sap collects at the bottom and blocks the stem from getting enough water. So if choosing a pre-cut tree, saw off the bottom half to one inch of the trunk, making the cut perpendicular to the axis. Do not angle the cut, or it will make it more difficult for the tree to take up water.

Christmas Tree Tips | Bowery Beach Farm

Tip 4: Thin out crowded branches before bringing indoors. Remove any sad-looking or congested branches outside. This not only makes the tree look better, but also reduces moisture lost through the needles.

Tip 5: Shake and see them drop – shake the tree outside to knock of any dead or loose needles so you have less of a mess in the house. Norway Spruce, Red Cedar, Virginia, White and Scotch Pines are known for dropping lots of needles initially, so be sure to shake them well.

Christmas Tree Tips | Bowery Beach Farm

Tip 6: Place the tree out of direct sunlight in a bucket of water outside. Once home you may need to prepare the space for your tree. Most trees can go 6-8 hours without water and still take up water, but to be on the safe keep it in a cool place with lots of water.

Tip 7: Keep your cool and avoid the heat. Don’t place your tree in direct sunlight or near sources of heat. It will last longer if kept cool and away for fireplaces, heaters and vents.

Tip 8: Use a traditional tree base with plenty of water! The best is a reservoir-type stand, and the rule of thumb is that the base should hold 1 quart of water per inch in tree trunk diameter.

Tip 9: Use a stand that fits your tree. Sounds obvious, but if you attempt to squeeze a larger tree into a too-small base it will die quicker. Whittling away around the edge of the trunk only opens up opportunities for infection, faster drying and reduces water uptake.

Christmas Tree Tips | Bowery Beach Farm

Tip 10: Monitor for freshness. Check your water daily to be sure your tree has enough to drink!

Tip 11: Reduce drying by using low heat lights, and be sure to turn them off when going to bed or leaving the house. The extra heat will dry out your tree faster.

Tip 12: Select a non-drop needle tree. Ignoring the obvious artificial tree, some trees drop less needles than others. Consider choosing a Nordmann Fir or Fraser Fir tree since they are known for excellent needle retention.

By |December 9th, 2015|Growing & Gardening|

Stop and Smell the Flowers

When I turned around and saw that my calendar said September I just about fell off my seat! Where did the summer go? Did I miss it? I’m sure everyone feels this way, but I just need to remind myself take a moment and pause. Take it in. Breathe. And stop and smell the roses … well at least the scented geraniums ….

Scented Geraniums | Bowery Beach Farm

One of my favorites this year was Mimosa – and that’s not only because a mimosa is a wonderful way to start the weekend. It has a deliciously sweet scent.

Mimosa Scented Geraniums | Bowery Beach Farm

But it is hard to beat the smell of heliotrope just after a rain.

That is why I like to plant it not only in the garden, but also in pots next to my window and door. So that whenever a breeze comes by, or I brush by it as I come in the house I get a whiff of the sweetness!

Heliotrope | Bowery Beach Farm

And even though dahlias aren’t fragrant, they are beyond beautiful. So much so that I forgive them for not inviting me in with their non-existent smell. This year I’m growing just under 100 plants, and one of my new trials will definitely be making it into the big dahlia beds next year. 

Mom's Special Dahlia | Bowery Beach Farm

Mom’s Special is indeed special. The photo in the catalog doesn’t do her justice. Streaked delicately with purple and white this dahlia is showy! Making it the perfect focal point in an arrangement or bouquet. Now I just wish I  had grown more of them … 

And that’s why there’s always next year!

 

 

By |September 8th, 2015|Cut Flowers, Growing & Gardening|

Happenings Here on the Farm

 

Things have been super busy here for us … I don’t even know where the Spring went. But it felt like we never really had much a a Spring anyway – we went …. Winter, Winter, Winter, Boom Summer. 

But that certainly didn’t stop us from growing (in more ways than one) this season. So our biggest and newest (and let’s be honest – most AWE-SOME!) addition to the farm is our Hoop House! We put it up in about 3.5 hours with the help of my husband and my sister’s boyfriend, who all did not believe me that those 10 24-foot steel tubes would turn into the gloriousness that is now our brand-spanky-new 50 foot hoop house.

Isn’t it beautiful?!

 

Bowery Beach Farm | Hanley Hoop House

 

And we dressed it up with some fancy landscape fabric.

 

Bowery Beach Farm | Greenhouse Fabric

 

Which I promptly burnt holes into so I could sow seed and transplant my seedlings. And I will share this with you because we are so close – I really should have burned the holes before I laid the fabric down flat … as it appears the torch goes out when you point it down. Making that a much more time consuming step. 

Next went down the drip line – which again, I will lay down first before I lay the fabric next year. It’s all working out okay since the fabric is permeable and the plants seem to really be loving the cool slow drink from the tubing. And before long … voilá! Big happy plants! All 350 of them in the greenhouse.

 

Bowery Beach Farm | Growing Dahlias

 

And the propagation house has also been bustling with activity since March.

 

Bowery Beach Farm | Growing Herbs

 

For which I have learned the very, very, very important task of crop scheduling. I know this sounds like a boring activity, but without it our market table would look quite sad. So there is an never-ending weekly dance of sowing, propagating, transplanting, planting, pruning, fertilizing and then … repeat. All the while keeping in mind how many plants are headed to the field or greenhouse for harvesting, and those to market for sale.

 

Bowery Beach Farm | Potting Bench

 

The planning may not be the most fun job, but it gets me to the best part of the job … the growing! 

My favorite way to pass the time in the greenhouse vacillates between sowing and taking cuttings. I love to start things from scratch, but I also love making scented geranium babies from the mommy plant. I find it very cathartic and peaceful. Sometimes I save this task for the end if I can so I have something to motivate me to move faster (which is always helpful since I have more of a sedentary personality).

 

Bowery Beach Farm | Attar Of Rose Scented Gernaium

 

When I look at my scented geranium table I feel so ridiculously happy that everyone’s growing and healthy. 

 

Bowery Beach Farm | Scented Geraniums

 

And that doesn’t even take into account the raised beds and field of herbs ready for harvest. 

 Bowery Beach Farm | Caraway

 

I will also share that I get incredibly excited when plants that take a few years to mature before they can be harvested are ready. I’ve waited 2 years and now I’m rewarded with lots of delicious caraway seed. I think I should make some bread with it … you know, just to test it out first. 🙂

By |July 14th, 2015|Bowery Beach Farm, Growing & Gardening, Hoop House Greenhouse|